Eric Verdin, MD
The Age of Better Aging is Now

In Conversation: April 2, 2019 | 3pm est/12pm pst

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Join Dr. Eric Verdin live April 2 from the Buck Institute, as he shares his perspectives on the tremendous advancements in biological understanding achieved in the last 30 years.

Dr. Verdin became President and CEO of The Buck in November, 2016. He was previously Associate Director and Senior Investigator at the Gladstone Institute for Virology and Immunology and has held faculty positions at the University of Brussels, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Picower Institute for Medical Research. Dr. Verdin is also a Professor of Medicine at UCSF. The Verdin lab focuses on how metabolism, diet and small molecules regulate a family of key proteins and thereby the aging process and its associated diseases.

Dr. Verdin has published more than 210 scientific papers and holds more than 15 patents. A native of Belgium, he earned his MD from the University of Liege and completed additional training at Harvard Medical School.

Science is showing that while chronological aging is inevitable, biological aging is malleable. There’s a part of it that you can fight, and we are getting closer and closer to winning that fight.

Help shape the upcoming conversation.

In his session, Dr. Verdin responded to many questions registered attendees sent in through this page, in the live discussion and social media.

  • 22

    votes

    What are the most powerful life changes that promote healthy aging?

  • 19

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    There is a lot of confusion and misinformation on diets. Does a solely plant-based diet contribute to longevity? What does research suggest?

  • 14

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    What recent research from any source should we be aware of concerning beneficial effects of diets, drugs, exercise on aging humans?

  • 11

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    What’s most promising in the science going on at the Buck?

  • 10

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    What is the most promising area of aging research in term of moving closer to human trials?

  • 10

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    Eric – a question about the list of things that we can already do today for healthy aging: Time-restricted eating (e.g. eating during not more than 8-9 hours per day), as well as a plant-based or even vegan diet (which is naturally protein-restricted and methionine-restricted – but supplemented with vitamins D and B12), as well as supplementing with the NAD+ precursor nicotinamide riboside, all seem to be reasonably safe interventions – would you expect any potential risks from combining these, i.e. possible interactions when doing ALL of these things?

  • 8

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    What kind of responsibility do you feel, as a physician and a scientist, to separate the hype from the hope for the public?

  • 8

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    You’ve indicated in the past that many chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer may have a common etiology and that the Keto Diet could impact risk. Do you still hold these views?

  • 8

    votes

    Which diet supplements, if any, promote longevity?

  • 7

    votes

    Recent studies have indicated that neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson’s, ALS and others may be the result of a mitochondrial dysfunction. What research does the Institute have underway (or in the pipeline) to investigate mitochondrial pathways that may play a role in neurodegenerative disease.

  • 7

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    What most excites you about the research happening today?

  • 6

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    You’ve celebrated the first 30 years of aging research. What breakthroughs do you imagine we’ll be celebrating 30 years from now?

  • 6

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    You’ve been quoted as saying we are at an inflection point in research on aging. What do you mean by that?

  • 5

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    How does marijuana benefit us oldsters?

  • 5

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    Have read that the brain shrinks as we age, is that inevitable or does diet, exercise slow this process?

  • 4

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    Epigenetics and longevity. What are the latest breakthroughs and findings?

  • 4

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    What do you think about the papers that warn about the dangers of incrementing NAD+ systemically since cancer cells are dependent on this coenzyme for survival? Do you think that incrementing the affinity of NAD+ for SIRT1 with metformin, as a recent paper points out, would be a better strategy than taking NAD precursors?

  • 4

    votes

    The buck is full of young scientists and researchers, what are your top goals for your students in this field?

  • 3

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    How relevant is the Bredesen protocol for Parkinson’s disease?

  • 2

    votes

    How do we distribute the “good” of aging research to all Homo sapiens? Is it a public good? What are the sustainability consequences of increased healthy human longevity on efforts to reach sustainability?

  • 1

    votes

    Please comment on the role that public health policies and practices play in healthy aging and longevity. Please comment on the role that a walkable, health communities play in supporting a long, healthy and engaged life. .

  • 1

    votes

    Your opinion on taking the amino acid L-serine to prevent neurodegenerative diseases, and does it provide any risks vis-a-vis cancer or the mTor pathway?

  • 1

    votes

    WhT is the best preventive currently known for vascular dementia?

  • 1

    votes

    What are your thoughts on Dr. Valter Longo’s research on his longevity diet and fasting mimicking diet (FMD)?

  • 1

    votes

    Can one listen to this podcast after the schedule time? Will there be a link provided? Thank you.

  • 1

    votes

    What is the Buck’s take on recent research suggesting that Alzheimer’s might be at least triggered by, and possibly caused by, infection?

  • 0

    votes

    Some years ago Buck held an event with David Perlmutter, who focused on avoiding grains in one’s diet. Recent reports strongly suggest including substantial amounts of whole grains daily. What is Buck’s current thinking on this conflict?

  • 0

    votes

    Besides best foods to eat n good hydration min 9 hours sleep. Have you found music and exercize n bemer therapy to oxygenate blood helpful in frontal temporal dementia? We have. Year fibe n our methods are working well.

  • 0

    votes

    Where’s the link “on Tuesday morning”? I didn’t get it – can’t figure a way on. Thanks.

  • 0

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    What is your feeling about the importance of your weight relating to health and long life?

  • 0

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    Is the Brednesan Protocol effective?

  • 0

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    Can I get a link to hear the presentation if I miss the lecture which will be starting at noon 4/2?

  • 0

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    We hear a lot about Alzheimer’s, but little about vascular dementias. Any information on how to slow or prevent vascular dementias or are the recommended protocols similar to what Brednesan describes for Alzheimer’s?

  • 0

    votes

    How much is the online program/discussion(s)

  • 0

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    None additional at this time.

  • 0

    votes

    Is there any scientific basis to prove efficacy of reminiscence therapy in care of MCI patients?

  • 0

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    For frontal temporal dementia no sugar makes a big difference what about natural sugars. Also please cover rewiring brain which is working with new methods. May be helpful to have actual one on one with people having great results with methods n see how certain activities create good results. This may be helpful in addition to watching mice results. Thankyou

  • 0

    votes

    I track developments in biophysics. It appears PEMF Systems are indeed beneficial for numerous difficulties. Your thoughts? Biophotonic devices?

  • 0

    votes

    Have you read about the research of Jan H. J. Hoeijmakers on the effect of caloric restriction on progeria syndromes? If yes do you think that it may be the first evidence that it has beneficial effects in humans or research with healthy subjects would still be necessary?

  • 0

    votes

    To what extent do an individual’s physical and mental elements (e.g. genetic make-up, blood type, bone structure)

  • 0

    votes

    affect his or her reaction to any particular diet, drug, aging treatment and how can you account for that?

  • 0

    votes

    I started taking Tur Niagen a month ago; I started with 125 mg 2X / day; then within 2 days went to 250 mb 2X / day. I felt stronger in weight lifting and biking and my sleep was better for about 4 days. Then I started getting bad cramps in my legs at night and I got pretty constipated and started to feel less energy. So I added TMG and the cramps went away but not the low energy or the constipation. I backed off to 62 mg 1 / day and still had problems. It seems to me that raising NAD is going to be very useful, but how should I do it if the Tru Niagen doesn’t work for me? Thanks.

  • 0

    votes

    Dr Verdin merci noted you said your primary focus is to get seniors engaged in society. great n can begin at buck. Have seniors with dementia who have been successful in their approaches to in essence rewire their brains to enjoy their day to day. After visiting buck it seemed that actual human interaction in your lab environment will give your scientists more than what they are seeing with mice. We are happy to share what is working with our family. No meds. So if the primary focus at buck is to develop meds vs. Methods med free ..this may need to change. At least for us we are getting great results in year five of frontal temporal dementia. Feel free to email us at keg1978@gmail.com the series is definitely a great step in interacting with seniirs who have a lot to offer. Maybe get a forum started n have a group at buck dedicate time to determining what is working in the world of dementia through the feedback you receive in an pngoing forum or blog. Encore..merci