Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD

Scientific Director, National Institute on Aging

In Conversation: April 30, 2019 | 3pm est/12pm pst

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Join Dr. Luigi Ferrucci live on April 30th from the National Institute on Aging, as he shares his perspectives on the tremendous advancements in biological understanding achieved in the last 30 years.

Dr. Ferrucci is a geriatrician and epidemiologist who conducts research on the causal pathways leading to progressive physical and cognitive decline in older persons. He has made significant contributions in the design of many major epidemiological studies conducted in both the United States and Europe.

Dr. Ferrucci received his MD and later his PhD in the biology and pathophysiology of aging from the University of Florence, Italy, and completed his internship at the Florence Institute of Gerontology and Geriatrics. He was an associate professor at the University of Florence before joining the Italian National Institute of Aging.

He came to the United States National Institute on Aging in 2002 and has been its scientific director since 2011.

“You can celebrate 30 years in many ways, but this has been an incredible 30 years!”

Help shape the upcoming conversation.

In his upcoming session, Dr. Ferrucci will respond to the five questions registered attendees want answered most.

You can help shape the upcoming conversation by checking out the list of attendee-requested questions below, and then voting to support the ones that match your own interest.

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  • 6

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    Where do you anticipate the biggest advancements to come from next?

  • 5

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    Is there a theoretical limit to how long humans can live?

  • 5

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    Is there a large marginal benefit for longer fasts (1-5 days) in comparison to intermittent (12-14 hour) fasts for cognitive function? How do these benefits compare to a low-carb diet? Is there a potential multiplicative effect of doing all of these? What are potential downsides? What evidence leads you to this conclusion?

  • 4

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    To what extent do you think intermittent fasting, extended fasting or caloric restriction helps with human longevity? What do you think of the hypothesis that extended fasts promote autophagy of senescent or otherwise unhealthy cells?

  • 4

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    What do you consider to be the biggest breakthroughs in the research on aging in the last 30 years?

  • 4

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    How has your personal work on the progressive physical and cognitive decline in older persons changed and developed in recent years?

  • 4

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    Based on your research, what control do individuals have on their own eventual physical and cognitive decline?

  • 3

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    How has the NIH’s role as the leader in aging research, training, and health information dissemination changed and developed during this period?

  • 2

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    Is NIA looking at any new biomarkers of physiological age, to accelerate research on human aging?

  • 2

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    Aubrey de grey recently stated that he believes that robust mouse rejuvenation is 3 years away. What do you think of this prediction?

  • 1

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    The Silver Tsunami is quickly approaching, where more adult diapers are sold than infant diapers. With massive amount of people retiring every day due to the I’ll effects of aging coupled with a sharp decline in births, the world is rapidly approaching financial collapse of our society. Not enough young people will be able to fund the aging population. Companies cant find enough workers and stressing their current team to the mac. The only real lasting solution out of this is the introduction of age rejuvenation so our seniors can still add wealth to the economy not only use it by continuing to work in great health as they we’re in their 20’s. This issue seems to be a National security risk, how can the NIH convince lawmakers of this rapidly approaching Silver Tsunami?

  • 1

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    The return on investment to bring the 7 Hallmarks of Aging under medical control can catapult the US economy to phenomenal health and financial rewards when introduced to the public. With some $4 trillion spent on health care now, if the NIH invested $1 billion in confirming and expediting the clinical trials for the 7 hallmarks using the Dr. Aubrey de Grey’s “Repair molecular damage approach” it seems reasonable to believe we can extend at least another 30 healthly years to everyone. This is akin to the NASA space race, the US can jump way ahead in the world to lead this paradigm shift. How can the NIA convince lawmakers to start heavily investing in this field? If the US drags their feet, China will surely take the lead to dominate this new business sector that will draw the dot com revolution. Thanks for your time!

  • 1

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    Where should the research into the cause of Alzheimer’s concentrate?

  • 0

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    What do you personally do on a daily basis to maintain your cognitive and physical well being? We assume that with all your access to this valuable longevity knowledge that you should be leading an exemplary lifestyle.